Thousands of Americans will enter Church at Easter Vigil

Los Angeles archdiocese will welcome 1,560 catechumens and 913 candidates; San Francisco archdiocese will welcome 174 catechumens and 175 candidates; San Diego diocese will welcome 306 catechumens and 806 candidates

Archbishop José H. Gomez presides over the Rite of Election ceremony with more than 1,500 local catechumens at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels March 10, 2019. (Victor Aleman)

Dioceses across the country will be welcoming thousands of people into the Catholic Church at Easter Vigil Masses on the evening of April 20th. As the culmination of the Easter Triduum, the Vigil celebrates the passion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. While people can become Catholic at any time of the year, the Easter Vigil is a particularly appropriate moment for adult catechumens to be baptized and for already-baptized Christians to be received into full communion with the Catholic Church. Parishes welcome these new Catholics through the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA).

Many of the dioceses across the nation have reported their numbers of people who intend to become Catholic on Saturday to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). Based on these reports, more than 37,000 people are expected to be welcomed into the Church at Easter Vigil Masses.

Prior to beginning the RCIA process, an individual comes to some knowledge of Jesus Christ, considers his or her relationship with Jesus Christ and is usually attracted in some way to the Catholic Church. Then during the RCIA process, which typically lasts nine months or more, a person learns the teachings of the Catholic Church in a more formal way and discerns that he or she is ready to commit to living according to these beliefs. Thousands of people have already passed through this process and are ready to take this step on Saturday in parishes throughout the country.

Two distinct groups of people will be initiated into the Catholic Church. Catechumens, who have never been baptized, will receive Baptism, Confirmation and first Communion at the Holy Saturday Easter Vigil. Candidates, who have already been baptized in another Christian tradition, will enter the Church through a profession of faith and reception of Confirmation and the Eucharist.

For example, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, the largest in the United States, will welcome 1,560 catechumens and 913 candidates; the Archdiocese of San Francisco will welcome 174 catechumens and 175 candidates; and the Diocese of San Diego will welcome 306 catechumens and 806 candidates.

Full story at USCCB.

Comments

  1. No way this would be happening without Mother Angelica…she was a game changer. And how she was opposed and by whom is most instructive on the direction the Church needs to take today. I think we got the point….

  2. What about the millions who have left and continue to leave

  3. The CCD article about the Gallup survey speaks volumes. As encouraging as the ‘inflow’ of Easter vigil is, the ‘outflow’ seems greater.

    • Anonymous says

      Because the inflow is the people who have discovered the treasures of the Church and are grateful and awestruck at the generosity and mercy of God. The outflow are people who have forgotten or never knew or who have let the devil, the flesh, and the world tempt them into spiritual death.
      Thanks for the kick in the pants. I really was thinking about not attending Mass anymore because someone was a passive aggressive snob to me at Easter Mass. The devil is real.

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