Not just for Protestants anymore

Increasing number of Catholic parishes now offer Bible study groups

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An increasing number of Catholic parishes are offering Bible studies to parishioners, with some churches featuring a variety of studies targeted for specific audiences, such as women and young people. 

For many Catholics, the idea of studying the Bible is a new concept. Katie Dawson, director of the Office of Parish Faith Formation for the Diocese of Orange, notes that the Protestants claimed the Scripture as their own in the great divorce called the Reformation, while Catholics held onto the sacraments. 

With a more educated laity, in modern times the Church acknowledges a newfound understanding of the place Scripture should occupy in a life of faith, she adds. Thus, Bible study is a logical next step. 

“Saint Jerome famously said, ‘ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ.’ When we understand the broad sweep of the story being told from the first book of Genesis all the way through to the book of Revelations, we see the story of God’s attempt to redeem us and to provide us restoration into relationship with him,” Dawson explains. 

If you’re interested in joining a Bible study, Dawson recommends that you start by inquiring at your parish. In addition, several online tools and video series are available for those who want to start their own study or create a group study. 

A phone application called Verbum, available for iPhones and Android phones, offers the Bible and additional resources. The Daily Audio Bible Mobile app also is free of charge and offers a community of readers on the same Scripture journey. 

Whether or not you join a Bible study group, Dawson advises, do not start your journey through the Scriptures at the beginning. “By the time you get to Leviticus you’ll give up,” she says. “There’s plenty of stuff in there that’s helpful for scholars, but the average person needs to understand the point and then dig a little deeper. 

Full story at OC Catholic.

Comments

  1. Lou Varini says

    The question remains whether the “study” group will be “Catholic”, not just to cater to diversity for the sake of diversity.

  2. One of Luther’s theses was that the Bible be available in German so the average person could read it. Of course, this threatened the clergy’s monopoly of Latin.

    • Lou Varini says

      Luther was also wrong on his two basic premises of Sola Fide and Sola Scriptura. Besides, Luther also REMOVED seven (7) books from the canonical Bible, because they did not support his self-contrived premises of Soal Fide and Sola Scriptura.

    • Hippo Gus says

      Mike,

      It appears that you have formed an invalid conclusion based on a false premise. Read my response below.

  3. Marty Martins says

    As they should have been doing all along. The Catholic Church determined the canon of the Bible and then surrendered mastery of it to the Prots.

  4. Hippo Gus says

    There was NO monoply. The Catholic Bible was officially compiled the late 4th Century, initially in Greek, which was the vernacular language of the Eastern Roman Empire. From that source, it was also translated into the other vernacular languages of that time, including Latin, which was the vernacular language of the Western Roman Empire, and also made available in the other vernacular languages of that time, including Syriac and Coptic.

  5. From the very beginning, Christian scholars tried to protect the Holy Bible from anyone who might try to change it, with their own misguided ideas. Only trained clergy had the ability to teach and preach Biblical truths. Most laymen could not read nor write, and books were very scarce, prior to Gutenberg’s era. Even though lacking education, many laymen still desired to have a Bible in their vernacular language to try to read. Bless them! A painful conflict resulted!

  6. “…targeted to…women…” Really?

  7. Reading the Bible is essential for Catholics as we are Christians and must be knowledgeable of the Sacred Scriptures. Just make sure you are reading a Catholic Bible! The Catholic Study Bible (New American Bible Revised Edition, AKA NABRE) published by Oxford University Press is an excellent Bible for Catholics.

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