Archbishop Gomez: “Holiness wears many faces”

Oct. 14 canonizations include a young layperson, two women religious, two priests, a bishop and a pope

(image: Dianne Rohkohl)

Here in Rome, we are approaching the midpoint of the Synod on Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment, and we are preparing for a special moment in the Church’s life — the canonizations of seven men and women by Pope Francis on October 14.   

Even as I write, they are preparing to hang the large tapestries bearing the images of our new saints on the facade of St. Peter’s Basilica. 

It is a beautiful reminder that holiness in the Church wears many faces. 

The saints show us that the purpose of our lives is to be saints — and this is true for every one of us.

Our new saints reflect the diversity of roles in the Church — there is a young layperson, two women religious, two priests, a bishop and a pope. And the stories of these new saints show us how exciting it is to give your life to Jesus Christ and the mission of his Church. 

Of course, the most well-known are St. Pope Paul VI and St. Archbishop Oscar Romero. 

Paul VI was the pope of Vatican II, who called the Church to proclaim holiness and salvation to the modern world and to rediscover the beauty and ethics of human love. 

Archbishop Romero was a heroic defender of the poor and a martyr for the faith. I am looking forward to celebrating his canonization with hundreds of Salvadoran pilgrims from Los Angeles this week. 

The others being canonized, while not “household names,” followed the call of Christ and led fascinating lives, overcoming personal setbacks and sufferings in order to spread God’s kingdom in their time and place.   

Two of our new saints show us what holiness looks like in the lives of ordinary parish priests. St. Francesco Spinelli preached holiness and fostered adoration to the Blessed Sacrament in his parishes, while St. Vincenzo Romano had a special love for orphan children and was known for his beautiful expression, “Do the good well.” 

Our new St. Maria Catherine Kasper lost her father when she was 21 and was forced to work as a farmhand to support her family. 

Inspired by the Blessed Virgin Mary’s self-offering to God, she founded the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ, which continues to serve the poor in India, Brazil, Mexico, and in parts of Africa, Europe, and the United States.  

The new St. Nunzio Sulprizio was orphaned at a young age, abused by a stepfather and later an uncle who took him in when his mother died. 

He died at 19, enduring a long and painful struggle with bone cancer, including having his leg amputated. Throughout a short lifetime of sufferings, he was known for his cheerfulness and patience, offering everything to God and trying to bring others to know Jesus. 

Our new St. Nazaria Ignacia March Mess lived in Mexico and founded a religious order to spread what she called “a crusade of love” throughout South America. 

“Loving, obeying and cooperating with the Church in its work of preaching the Gospel to every creature. That is our life, that is who we are,” she said. 

That is a beautiful description of what all of us should be striving for. This is our life, this is who we are made to be.

But what we see in the lives of our new saints is that much of the “stuff” of holiness is ordinary. It does not make for dramatic stories. Often the saints live in silence, known only to the people in their families and immediate communities. 

One “constant” we find in the stories of our new saints is that they were raised to take their Catholic faith seriously, that they had a strong personal relationship with Jesus and believed in the power of the sacraments, especially the Eucharist. 

Full story at Angelus News.

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Comments

  1. Susan in Cerritos says:

    Oh, so the saints are diverse. So PC. A constant among those who are holy is that they oppose gayifying the church. Why doesn’t the archbishop write about that aspect of holiness?

    The list of speakers for the Anaheim Religious EduGAYtion Congress has been published. Gay this, gay that. So many speakers on gay topics. All the usual suspects, including the dissident Fr. James Martin.

    Instead of namedropping in Rome, AB Gomez, why don’t you clean up your own archdiocese? You’ve had years to do it, and things have just gotten worse. The RECongress is not Catholic anymore. It’s that bad.

  2. From Fr. Pio Pace: “We must dare say it: by canonizing all Vatican II popes, it is Vatican II that is canonized..”

  3. Eagle Tom says:

    Evil also wears many faces, some of which appear to be pleasing:

    “May be the devil, and the devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps, out of my weakness and my melancholy, as he is very potent with such spirits.” (Hamlet, Act 2, Scene 2)

  4. Anonymous says:

    Saint Pope Paul VI, pray for us.
    St. Oscar Romero, pray for us.
    St. Vincent Romano, pray for us.
    St. Francesco Spinelli, pray for us.
    St. Nunzio Sulprizio, pray for us.
    St. Nazia Ignacia March Mesa, pray for us.
    St. Maria Katharina Kasper, pray for us.

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