‘A taste for public policy advocacy’

San Bernardino diocese’s newspaper features photo of young Catholics with pro-abortion state senator

Pro-abortion state Senator Connie Leyva with teenagers from the San Bernardino diocese who attended Catholic Youth Advocacy Day. (photo: Inland Catholic Byte)

California Catholic Daily exclusive
By Claudia Mendoza

Catholic Youth Advocacy Day, held in late March at the state Capitol, is sponsored by the bishops’ lobby, the California Catholic Conference, and underwritten in the San Bernardino diocese by Catholic Charities.

On May 1, the BYTE, the official news source of the San Bernardino diocese, published a photo of militantly pro-abortion, Planned Parenthood-funded state Senator Connie Leyva with teenagers from the San Bernardino diocese who attended Catholic Youth Advocacy Day in Sacramento on March 23. The headline was, “Youth Advocacy Sows Seeds of Future Leaders.”

“The event is arranged by the California Catholic Conference and is intended to give youth a taste for public policy advocacy while also providing further catechesis on Catholic Social Teaching,” according to the BYTE article. “The Diocesan delegation was from Corpus Christi, Corona; Our Lady of Guadalupe, San Bernardino; St. Louis, Cathedral City; St. Mary, Fontana and Notre Dame High School.”

But the article made no mention of Sen. Leyva’s (D-Chino) longtime pro-abortion voting record, nor of the fact that she recently authored Planned Parenthood’s bill to force state-funded colleges and universities to provide abortion-inducing pills to students at taxpayer expense.

According to Levya’s bill, “Abortion care is a constitutional right and an integral part of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care.”

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  1. Looks like none of them skips any meals.

  2. Bob One says:

    I don’t support abortion! Realistically, however, if one person or a group of people are going to go to the State Capital for any advocacy program, they will likely meet with members of the Legislature who are pro-choice. If they want to meet with their Assembly Member or Senator it is likely that they will meet with a pro-choice person. If they are advocating for anything Catholic, they must meet with pro-choice people to try to convince them to do the right thing. The option is to never go to the Capital and never learn to advocate and participate in the democratic process.

  3. Dear Bob One – You are correct in that they are very likely to meet with pro-abortion legislators. HOWEVER, that’s not the problem, and your supposed “option” (never go to the Capitol, etc) doesn’t follow either. The problem is NOT their meeting with pro-abort legislators, the problem is that the diocese chose to use THIS photo – all hugs and smiles with a very public and vocal pro-abort and anti-family politician – for their article. Photos like this confuse and lead astray the faithful when they are trying to discern how to engage in their civic duty with politicians who are diametrically opposed to the foundation of Catholic Social Teaching – the dignity of human life and the nuclear family as the foundation for the state.

    • Bob One says:

      Julia, good point!

      • Anne T. says:

        Bob, I am glad you see Julia’s point. One can keep such things professional without looking as if one is best friends with such people and agree with everything they are doing. Often it is better to asked to be excluded from such pictures or excuse oneself and go to the ladies or gentlemen’s room or another area when they are taken.

  4. Michael McDermott says:

    Bay Area demonstrators may be paid to protest, by employers
    As reported by the San Francisco Chronicle:
    It’s a common accusation lobbed at liberal protesters gathered at town hall meetings, statehouses and in the streets: They’re being paid to protest.

    Thanks to a rising trend among tech companies and some Bay Area firms, some, in fact, may be.
    Since the beginning of the year, an increasing number of companies have unveiled policies that allow employees to take paid time off work for political or civic activities, such as protesting, canvassing, voting, volunteering or even running for office.

    Big corporations like Comcast and outdoor-apparel maker Patagonia have been offering social-justice benefits to their employees for years…

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